12.04.2017

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My latest food column for Martha’s Vineyard Magazine is here and it has my new favorite slow cooker dinner recipe inside. Here is a bit of it…

“Have you ever had a slow-cooker fantasy? You know the one, where you imagine walking into your house after a long day at work, push open the door, and are immediately hit by the smell of a homemade meal simmering away? Maybe it’s beef stew, a vegetable curry, pulled pork, or butternut squash soup? Me, too, and I don’t think we’re alone. There is something magical about a nutritious, affordable, warm, home-cooked dinner ready and waiting for you. Even if you did all the dinner planning, preparation, and filled that slow cooker mere hours before, the reality that dinner cooked itself is never anything less than extraordinary…”

Click here to read more of the story from Martha’s Vineyard Magazine – Slow & Steady and get the recipe for Slow-Cooker Moroccan Chicken Thighs with Sweet Potato.

This recipe really is a winner – it looks like it took blood, sweat, and tears, but your slow-cooker secret is safe with me. Another benefit, Slow-Cooker Moroccan Chicken Thighs with Sweet Potato tastes exotic but calls for a short list of easy-to-find ingredients. I like to serve it over couscous, though any grain or vegetable makes a suitable bed. Don’t skip the toppings – the fresh cilantro, squirt of bright lemon, and crunchy almonds make a big difference.

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03.16.2017

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This week on Food52 I shared my favorite way to cook dried beans and how to stretch a pot of humble beans into a week of family dinners.

I was always intimidated by cooking dried beans. I would either forget to soak them ahead of time (ahhhh!) or keep them simmering in a pot, only to find them undercooked at the end of the day. After a while, I began to shy away from recipes that suggested I try it again.

Discovering the simplicity of preparing dried beans in the slow cooker has thrown my trepidation out the window. You just combine a few ingredients and turn on the machine! A few hours later you have a perfect pot of beans. Life-changing. (But if you don’t have a slow cooker, fear not: I recommend the method outlined in this recipe.)

Click here to read the full story and get four recipes from Feeding a Family including: Slow Cooker Black Beans, Buckwheat Crepes with Delicata Squash, Black Beans & Avocado, Kale & Sweet Potato Tacos on Homemade Corn Tortillas, and Black Bean Quinoa Burgers.

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All photography by Elizabeth Cecil.

02.02.2017

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I wrote The Beginner’s Guide to Juice Making for Food52. Check it out! 

Whether you received a juicer over the holidays, are in the midst of a New Year’s resolution kick, or simply want to get more fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet (who doesn’t?), you may be curious about juicing…click here to read the full article and get the recipes.

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Photography by Elizabeth Cecil

05.05.2016

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A couple of weeks ago Design Mom interviewed me about our house and what it’s like to live year-round on Martha’s Vineyard. She sent along 10 really insightful questions for us to answer. The whole process allowed me to sit and reflect on how much work we (well, mostly Nick) has done to our house and organize my thoughts about the pros and cons of living here. I came out of it feeling even more grateful for this home and community. I’ve included the interview questions here and a link to my answers at the bottom on the post.

I’m sure you’ve seen glimpses inside our house on my instagram page but if you haven’t here is a sneak peak inside. Someday I want to share the before pictures too but that requires some organizing and digging. And what’s with this big chicken you’re asking? I decided to spontaneously roast a whole bird earlier in the week and it was such a good move for many reasons: 1. One-pot dinner! 2. We’re on day 5 of cold and rain 3. I ate the leftover vegetables with eggs for breakfast this morning 4. I made stock in the slow cooker for soup tonight. So much goodness has come out of this simple meal.

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Spring Roast Chicken

1 4 to 5 pound chicken

3 sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch rounds

1 onion, peeled and cut into quarters

Small bunch scallions, ends trimmed

1 lemon, sliced into rounds

Olive oil

Salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 425 F and toss all the vegetables, sliced lemon, a few glugs of olive oil, salt, and pepper, in the bottom of a roasting pan. Put the chicken on top of the vegetables, tie the legs together, fold in the wings, and rub the skin with olive oil. Sprinkle over salt and pepper.

Roast for 1 1/2 hours, rotating the pan half way through. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Psst – I know the edges of the vegetables look burned but I promise they don’t taste that way.

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1. Tell us who lives here! All the quirks. Maybe how you and your husband met, what you both do for work, and a few unique details about your kids.

2. Tell us where, exactly, you live. Describe your neighborhood, neighbors, why you love it, why you don’t love it, housing prices (NO ONE EVER TALKS PRICES!), and the cool things nearby. Also, MARTHA’S VINEYARD! All the things we couldn’t get from a guide book!

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3. How did this home become yours? Describe the process of finding and then making it yours. Was it hard? Effortless? Any tricks to buying in your area?

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4. A 1924 cottage! Tell us how hard it is to modernize a property like that! All the nitty gritty details that no one ever tells you before a project like this.

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5. You write cookbooks! Tell us about that. Where did you get your start? Give us some interesting highlights!

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6. You and your husband are both artists; how does that affect your design choices? Is it more difficult to choose how you want to live with your kids? Are you more unwilling to give in to ugly toys or messes? How do you integrate their style with your own?

7. What are the quirks of living on MV?! Any celebrity sightings?

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8. What do you hope your kids remember from this home and you as their parents?

9. What has been your absolute favorite thing about living with your own kids? What do you already miss?

10. Please finish the sentence: I wish someone had told me (and I had listened!)…

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READ ALL MY ANSWERS HERE

04.29.2016

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I am a chip magnet. Really anything crispy and salty appeals to me but if it happens to be in chip form all the better. This week we discovered how easy it is to make sweet potato chips at home. All you need is a mandolin and a sweet potato to make it happen. I sprinkled over a combination of our favorite ground spices (high quality onion powder seems to be my new answer to everything) but you can use any flavors your family likes from hot cayenne pepper to warm cinnamon.

In totally unrelated news, The Martha’s Vineyard Cookbook Club is reading and cooking from A Boat, a Whale, & a Walrus this month. If you need some new inspiration or want to start a cookbook club of your own this book is a beauty.

I hope you have a great weekend full of sweet potato chips and garden snails.

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Sweet Potato Chips

1 large sweet potato

Olive oil

A big pinch of cumin

A big pinch of paprika

A big pinch of onion powder

Kosher salt

 

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First, preheat the oven to 400 F. Peel the sweet potato and, using a mandolin, slice into very thin rounds. In a large bowl, toss the rounds with oil and ground spices of your choice (we really liked the combination of salt, cumin, paprika, and onion powder).

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Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and arrange the rounds in a single layer across the sheet. You will have enough sweet potato rounds for 3 sheets. The chips cook so quickly I simply made one tray at a time but you can put two in the oven at once, flipping positions halfway through, if you’d like.

Cook the chips for 5 minutes, flip, and cook for another 3 minutes or until the edges are deeply golden. Eat warm or let cool to room temperature. The chips seemed as though they would keep well stored in an airtight container but we ate them all too fast to find out.

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