02.02.2017

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I wrote The Beginner’s Guide to Juice Making for Food52. Check it out! 

Whether you received a juicer over the holidays, are in the midst of a New Year’s resolution kick, or simply want to get more fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet (who doesn’t?), you may be curious about juicing…click here to read the full article and get the recipes.

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Photography by Elizabeth Cecil

01.18.2017

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I made this warm vegetable salad the other day when I wanted to eat something filling yet nutritious, warm and comforting yet light. In the season of salads, juice cleanses, and bunny rabbit diets, food like this (flavorful, unique, satisfying) is welcomed. Miso-Curry Winter Squash with Tofu, Kale & Cilantro packs up perfectly for lunch but also makes a delicious light dinner or side dish. The original recipe calls for pepitas to be sprinkled atop the veggies. I didn’t have any handy but I’m sure any nut or seed would make a nice crunchy topping. This dish also holds up well in the fridge making it a perfect make ahead dish.

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Miso-Curry Winter Squash: Tofu, Kale, Cilantro adapted from Super Natural Every Day

Serves 4

12 ounces delicata or acorn squash

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup white miso

1 tablespoon red Thai curry paste

14-ounces extra-firm tofu, cut into small cubes

6 baby red potatoes, quartered

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1 1/2 cups chopped kale leaves

2/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

 

Preheat the oven to 400F with a rack in the middle of the oven. Cut the squash in half lengthwise and use a spoon to clear out all the seeds. Cut into 1/2-inch thick half-moons.

In a medium bowl, whisk together olive oil, miso, and curry paste. Combine the tofu, potatoes, and squash in a large bowl with 1/3 cup of the miso-curry paste. Use your hands to toss well, then turn the vegetables onto a rimmed baking sheet and arrange in a single layer.

Roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until everything is tender and browned. Keep a close watch as the vegetables can go from browned to burned in a flash.

In the meantime, whisk the lemon juice into the remaining miso-curry paste, then stir in the kale until coated.

Toss the roasted vegetables gently with the kale and cilantro. Serve family style in a large bowl or on a platter.

01.16.2017

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After two years of hard work I can proudly say that my book Feeding a Family: A Real-Life Plan for Making Dinner Work is available for pre-order. I am so proud of this book and all the hours of research, cooking, writing, shooting with Elizabeth Cecill and editing that went into it. For all of you doing your best to feed the ones you love – this is for you.

You can order online wherever books are sold.

*Cue the champagne, fireworks, high-fives, and victory jumps!*

But first…what is Feeding a Family anyway?

Reclaim the family dinner! In Feeding a Family, nutritionist and mom Sarah Waldman lays out all the tools you need to break out of the mealtime rut and turn dinner into a nutritionally fulfilling and happy occasion—despite busy schedules, long work days, and picky eaters. Through forty complete meals, you’ll discover hearty dinners the whole family will love, including:

-A meal for using up the best summer garden produce: Make-ahead Zucchini, Beef, and Haloumi Cheese Skewers with Chimichurri Sauce paired with Tomato, Peach, and Red Onion Panzanella and Lemon-Blackberry Custard

-A cozy and comforting dinner for a frenzied fall day: Creamy Tomato and Spinach Soup with Grilled Cheese Croutons and Pear Pie in Cornmeal Crust

-The perfect meal for the busiest night of the week: Slow Cooker Indian Butter Chicken with Sweet Peas and Lemon-Pecan Shortbread Cookies

-A warming (and fun) winter meal: One-pot Slurpee Noodle Bowls with simple Chocolate, Peanut Butter, and Date Truffles for dessert

-Sunday suppers for when you have a bit more time to play in the kitchen, such as Homemade Pasta with Heirloom Tomato Sauce and Pavlova with Blueberries

With suggestions for including older kids in mealtime prep, tips for feeding baby, and ideas for extending ingredients for “tomorrow’s dinner,” Feeding a Family is a playbook that includes the whole family.

“Sarah’s recipes are my favorite kind of recipes-wholesome, simple, and most important, strategic. Feeding young kids often requires a bonafide battle plan, and this book outlines that plan deliciously.” – Jenny Rosenstrach, author of Dinner: A Love Story and Dinner: The Playbook

“I consider myself pretty adept at cooking wholesome meals, but since I’ve had kids, I have found it more difficult to make something for dinner that everyone will eat. Sarah’s book is filled with ideas that help put a colorful and virtuous meal on the table without complicating things or taking a ton of time. I am sure I’ll be using this book as a weekly reference.” -Sara Forte, author of Sprouted Kitchen and Sprouted Kitchen: Bowl + Spoon

“Sarah Waldman’s Feeding a Family manages to somehow be beautifully modern and dreamily old-fashioned in equal measure. It reminds us that taking the time to cook from scratch is one of the most full-hearted ways to care for family and provides the tools and season-by-season recipes to make it happen. The deliciously homespun desserts alone are worth the price of the book.” -Katie Sullivan Morford, author of Rise & Shine

“Sarah Waldman’s Feeding a Family is filled with recipes for simple, wholesome, and seasonal meals. Maybe more importantly, it offers a recipe for cultivating a family mealtime tradition where stress and fuss melt away and togetherness takes center stage. Written in a style that’s relatable, upbeat, and encouraging, Feeding a Family gives parents of young children pragmatic tips for reclaiming dinnertime, one meal at a time.” – Erin Boyle, author of Simple Matters and creator of the blog Reading My Tea Leaves

01.10.2017

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Our first big snow fall hit this weekend and all I can think about is cooking and eating soup and biscuits so forgive me for another soup suggestion. This Spicy Tomato Soup is from Barabara Lynch and it is spicy. If you don’t love a serious kick of heat I would cut the red pepper flakes in half. At its core, this recipe is a 5-ingredient vegan soup built from simple pantry items. And where there is soup there is dipping. Biscuits make mean dippers – especially when they’re covered with everything bagel seed mix. If you’d rather use your biscuits to hold fried eggs, red onion, cheese, and spinach then I’m not stopping you. We started our fair share of mornings that way too.

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Barbara Lynch’s Spicy Tomato Soup

serves 6

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

small yellow onion, peeled, halved, and sliced into 1/4-inch-thick slices

teaspoon red pepper flakes (or to taste — I used a 1/2 teaspoon and it was almost too spicy for me)

2 (28-ounce) cans whole tomatoes

1 1/2 cups water

1/4 cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves

Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Crème fraîche, for garnish (optional)

1. Heat the olive oil in a large saucepan over medium heat until shimmering. Add the onions and red pepper flakes and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are translucent and very tender, about 10 minutes.

2. Stir in the tomatoes and their juices, plus the water, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the flavors have melded, about 30 minutes. (If you’re in a hurry, you can skip the simmer time — just add a bit less water.) Add the basil, season with salt and pepper, remove from the heat, and let cool briefly, about 5 minutes.

3. Set a fine-mesh strainer over a large, heatproof bowl. Using a blender, purée the soup in batches until smooth, removing the small cap from the blender lid (the pour lid) and covering the space with a kitchen towel (this allows steam from the hot soup to escape and prevents the blender lid from popping off).

4. Pour the blended soup through the strainer, pressing on the solids with a rubber spatula or ladle; discard the solids. Taste the soup and season with additional salt and pepper as needed.

5. Return the soup to the saucepan and reheat on medium low until hot. If you choose, serve topped with a tablespoon of crème fraîche.

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Everything Biscuits from Small Victories

Makes 12 biscuits

2 teaspoons poppy seeds

2 teaspoons sesame seeds

2 teaspoons onion flakes

4 cups all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 teaspoon kosher salt

8 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into ½-in cubes and chilled

1 ½ cups buttermilk, plus more for brushing

1. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and set aside. (You can skip this if you’d like, since all of the butter in the dough will keep the biscuits from sticking, but I love anything that makes cleaning up easier).

2. In a small bowl, stir together the poppy seeds, sesame seeds, and onion flakes. Set aside. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Whisk more than you think you should — this isn’t just to combine the ingredients but also to aerate them. Plus, how much easier is it to clean a whisk than a sifter, amiright?? Using your hands, work the butter into the flour mixture, rubbing it between your fingers until the mixture turns into coarse crumbs. Using a wooden spoon, gently stir in the buttermilk until the mixture becomes a shaggy dough — no need to overmix here. Stir in half of the poppy seed mixture.

3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and pat it out so that it’s about 1 in thick. Using a 2½-in round cutter (or a juice glass), stamp out biscuits as close together as possible. Transfer the biscuits to the prepared baking sheet, spacing them evenly. Pat the dough scraps together (do not overwork the dough), reroll, and cut out more biscuits. You should end up with a dozen biscuits. Place the baking sheet in the refrigerator and chill the biscuits for about 1 hour. Baking them from cold will yield flakier biscuits (the butter will be slower to melt and will create more distinct layers); but if you don’t have time, don’t worry—the biscuits will still be very good.

4. Meanwhile, preheat your oven to 450°F. Right before baking, brush each biscuit lightly with buttermilk and then sprinkle evenly with the remaining poppy seed mixture.

5. Bake the biscuits until they’re risen and golden, 15 to 20 minutes, turning the baking sheet halfway through baking. Serve warm

01.09.2017

 

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My latest article for Food52 was published last week. Photographs by Elizabeth Cecil. 

Grilled Cheese Croutons (& Other Soup Toppings) to Put Oyster Crackers to Shame

Good soup toppings balance whatever is inside the bowl with crunch (say, from a sprinkle of toasted pumpkin seeds), a hit of acidity (from a squeeze of lemon), spice (from a dash of chile flakes), or cooling refreshment (from a swirl of yogurt).

And it’s not that hard to think beyond oyster crackers. By taking only a few extra minutes (while your soup boils, perhaps?), you can make toppings—like grilled cheese croutons, salt and vinegar potato croutons, and chimichurri sauce—that will make winter soups, stews, and chilis feel like special meals.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL STORY AND GET THE RECIPES

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