02.14.2017

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To celebrate Valentine’s Day I made my loves a lemon tart while watching Beyonce’s grammy performance over and over and over again. Now I’m tearing up looking at these amazing pictures my pal Becca snapped of me and the boys in the fall. I love you Waldman boys – so very very much.

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Lemon Tart from My Kitchen Year

makes 1 9-inch tart

1/2 cup cashews (or unsalted almonds or hazelnuts)

1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar

3/4 cup flour

Salt

10 tablespoons unsalted butter

3 tablespoons olive oil

5 large eggs, separated

4 large lemons

3/4 cup sugar

2 teaspoons cornstarch

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Begin by making a tart shell. Toast the cashews then grind them in a food processor with the flour, confectioner’s sugar, and a pinch of salt. Add in 4 tablespoons of butter and pulse until it is the size of peas. Stir in the olive oil and 1 egg yolk.

Form the dough into a disk, put it between two pieces of plastic wrap, and roll it out to an 11-inch round. Press dough gently into a 9-inch tart shell with a removable bottom, and chill for half an hour. Bake in a 400-degree oven for about 15 minutes and allow to cool on a rack.

To make the filling, grate the zest from 1 lemon. Squeeze all 4 lemons and mix the juice with the zest. Put the lemon mixture into a heavy-bottomed pot and whisk in the sugar and cornstarch. Whisk in 2 eggs plus 2 additional yolks.

Put the pot on the stove and turn the heat to medium high. Whisk constantly until the mixture begins to boil, then keep whisking for a couple more minutes until the mixture is smooth and thick.

Remove from the heat, add 6 tablespoons of butter (cut into pieces), and whisk the mixture until the butter has vanished. Spread into the tart shell and allow to cool. Put the tart in the refrigerator to chill for at least 2 hours.

I sliced a few kumquats for the top and served slices with whipped cream.

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02.10.2017

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I know weather talk is really boring most of the time but this has been a wild weather week for us so, forgive me. It was 55 degrees on Wednesday. We stayed late after school playing soccer, football, and sliding down the slide 1,000 times. Nobody had a jacket on. Then came Thursday. A storm blew in and dumped wet, heavy snow all across the island. Most houses lost power, the ferries stopped running, and school was canceled. Today, the island looks pretty and sparkly with its fresh coat of white but it hasn’t gotten warmer than 25 degrees and I do prefer those jacket-less winter days, however abnormal they are.

If you’re looking for an easy cooking project this weekend or simply want a new snack to toss into lunch boxes next week give these Popcorn “Granola” Bars a try. The list of ingredients is completely adaptable to your tastes and your pantry.

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Popcorn “Granola” Bars slightly adapted from Food52

Makes 1 9-inch by 13-inch pan of bars

cup almond or peanut butter

1/3 cup honey, agave, or maple syrup

1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce or fruit compote 

Olive oil, as needed

4 to 6 cups popcorn

1 1/2 cups whole walnuts or almonds or a combination

1/3 cup raw hulled pumpkin seeds

1/2 cup unsweetened shredded coconut

1/3 cup raw hulled sunflower seeds (I used raw sesame seeds) 

1/3 cup ground flax seed

 

1. Line a 9- by 13-inch baking pan with parchment or wax paper so that you have overhang.

2. In a small pot over low heat, warm the nut butter, honey, and applesauce until melted. You want a sauce that is loose enough to cover the popcorn kernels and become evenly distributed amongst them. You may need to whisk in some olive oil (a couple of tablespoons) to achieve this consistency.

3. In a large bowl, mix together popcorn, nuts, pumpkin seeds, coconut, sunflower seeds, and flax seed. Pour over the nut butter mixture and mix until thoroughly combined.

4. Dump into the prepared pan, then use plastic wrap to mush the mixture down evenly. Freeze overnight, then slice into bars! Store in the freezer.

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02.02.2017

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I wrote The Beginner’s Guide to Juice Making for Food52. Check it out! 

Whether you received a juicer over the holidays, are in the midst of a New Year’s resolution kick, or simply want to get more fresh fruits and vegetables in your diet (who doesn’t?), you may be curious about juicing…click here to read the full article and get the recipes.

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Photography by Elizabeth Cecil

01.18.2017

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I made this warm vegetable salad the other day when I wanted to eat something filling yet nutritious, warm and comforting yet light. In the season of salads, juice cleanses, and bunny rabbit diets, food like this (flavorful, unique, satisfying) is welcomed. Miso-Curry Winter Squash with Tofu, Kale & Cilantro packs up perfectly for lunch but also makes a delicious light dinner or side dish. The original recipe calls for pepitas to be sprinkled atop the veggies. I didn’t have any handy but I’m sure any nut or seed would make a nice crunchy topping. This dish also holds up well in the fridge making it a perfect make ahead dish.

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Miso-Curry Winter Squash: Tofu, Kale, Cilantro adapted from Super Natural Every Day

Serves 4

12 ounces delicata or acorn squash

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup white miso

1 tablespoon red Thai curry paste

14-ounces extra-firm tofu, cut into small cubes

6 baby red potatoes, quartered

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

1 1/2 cups chopped kale leaves

2/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

 

Preheat the oven to 400F with a rack in the middle of the oven. Cut the squash in half lengthwise and use a spoon to clear out all the seeds. Cut into 1/2-inch thick half-moons.

In a medium bowl, whisk together olive oil, miso, and curry paste. Combine the tofu, potatoes, and squash in a large bowl with 1/3 cup of the miso-curry paste. Use your hands to toss well, then turn the vegetables onto a rimmed baking sheet and arrange in a single layer.

Roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until everything is tender and browned. Keep a close watch as the vegetables can go from browned to burned in a flash.

In the meantime, whisk the lemon juice into the remaining miso-curry paste, then stir in the kale until coated.

Toss the roasted vegetables gently with the kale and cilantro. Serve family style in a large bowl or on a platter.

01.16.2017

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After two years of hard work I can proudly say that my book Feeding a Family: A Real-Life Plan for Making Dinner Work is available for pre-order. I am so proud of this book and all the hours of research, cooking, writing, shooting with Elizabeth Cecill and editing that went into it. For all of you doing your best to feed the ones you love – this is for you.

You can order online wherever books are sold.

*Cue the champagne, fireworks, high-fives, and victory jumps!*

But first…what is Feeding a Family anyway?

Reclaim the family dinner! In Feeding a Family, nutritionist and mom Sarah Waldman lays out all the tools you need to break out of the mealtime rut and turn dinner into a nutritionally fulfilling and happy occasion—despite busy schedules, long work days, and picky eaters. Through forty complete meals, you’ll discover hearty dinners the whole family will love, including:

-A meal for using up the best summer garden produce: Make-ahead Zucchini, Beef, and Haloumi Cheese Skewers with Chimichurri Sauce paired with Tomato, Peach, and Red Onion Panzanella and Lemon-Blackberry Custard

-A cozy and comforting dinner for a frenzied fall day: Creamy Tomato and Spinach Soup with Grilled Cheese Croutons and Pear Pie in Cornmeal Crust

-The perfect meal for the busiest night of the week: Slow Cooker Indian Butter Chicken with Sweet Peas and Lemon-Pecan Shortbread Cookies

-A warming (and fun) winter meal: One-pot Slurpee Noodle Bowls with simple Chocolate, Peanut Butter, and Date Truffles for dessert

-Sunday suppers for when you have a bit more time to play in the kitchen, such as Homemade Pasta with Heirloom Tomato Sauce and Pavlova with Blueberries

With suggestions for including older kids in mealtime prep, tips for feeding baby, and ideas for extending ingredients for “tomorrow’s dinner,” Feeding a Family is a playbook that includes the whole family.

“Sarah’s recipes are my favorite kind of recipes-wholesome, simple, and most important, strategic. Feeding young kids often requires a bonafide battle plan, and this book outlines that plan deliciously.” – Jenny Rosenstrach, author of Dinner: A Love Story and Dinner: The Playbook

“I consider myself pretty adept at cooking wholesome meals, but since I’ve had kids, I have found it more difficult to make something for dinner that everyone will eat. Sarah’s book is filled with ideas that help put a colorful and virtuous meal on the table without complicating things or taking a ton of time. I am sure I’ll be using this book as a weekly reference.” -Sara Forte, author of Sprouted Kitchen and Sprouted Kitchen: Bowl + Spoon

“Sarah Waldman’s Feeding a Family manages to somehow be beautifully modern and dreamily old-fashioned in equal measure. It reminds us that taking the time to cook from scratch is one of the most full-hearted ways to care for family and provides the tools and season-by-season recipes to make it happen. The deliciously homespun desserts alone are worth the price of the book.” -Katie Sullivan Morford, author of Rise & Shine

“Sarah Waldman’s Feeding a Family is filled with recipes for simple, wholesome, and seasonal meals. Maybe more importantly, it offers a recipe for cultivating a family mealtime tradition where stress and fuss melt away and togetherness takes center stage. Written in a style that’s relatable, upbeat, and encouraging, Feeding a Family gives parents of young children pragmatic tips for reclaiming dinnertime, one meal at a time.” – Erin Boyle, author of Simple Matters and creator of the blog Reading My Tea Leaves